Skip to main content

'Virtual safe space' to help bumblebees



Source:
University of Exeter
Summary:
The many threats facing bumblebees can be tested using a 'virtual safe space.'


personal chef fort lauderdale
This is a bumblebee (Bombus lapidarius).
Credit: Matthias Becher



The many threats facing bumblebees can be tested using a "virtual safe space" created by scientists at the University of Exeter. Bumble-BEEHAVE provides a computer simulation of how colonies will develop and react to multiple factors including pesticides, parasites and habitat loss.
The tool lets researchers, farmers, policymakers and other interested parties test different land management techniques to find out what will be most beneficial for bees. Field experiments can be very timely and costly, so results from Bumble-BEEHAVE can help refine and reduce the number of experiments needed.
Bumble-BEEHAVE -- which is freely available online -- is a powerful tool that can make predictions, according to a new study.
"We know that pollinator decline is a really big problem for crops and also for wildflowers," said Dr Grace Twiston-Davies, of the Environment and Sustainability Institute at the University of Exeter's Penryn Campus in Cornwall.
"Bumble-BEEHAVE takes into account the many complicated factors that interact to affect bumblebees.
"This provides a virtual safe space to test the different management options."
"It's a free, user-friendly system and we're already starting to work with land managers and wildlife groups on the ground."
Disentangling the many factors that affect bumblebee colonies is incredibly complicated, meaning real-word testing of different methods by land managers is often not feasible.
This problem prompted the Exeter scientists to create the BEEHAVE (honeybees) and Bumble-BEEHAVE computer models. Bumble-BEEHAVE can simulate the growth, behaviour and survival of six UK bumblebee species living in a landscape providing various nectar and pollen sources to forage on.
"The Bumble-BEEHAVE model is a significant step towards predicting bumblebee population dynamics," said Professor Juliet Osborne, who leads the BEEHAVE team.
"It enables researchers to understand the individual and interacting effects of the multiple stressors affecting bumblebee survival and the feedback mechanisms that may buffer a colony against environmental stress, or indeed lead to spiralling colony collapse.
"The model can be used to aid the design of field experiments, for risk assessments, to inform conservation and farming decisions and for assigning bespoke management recommendations."
Professor Osborne and team won the BBSRC Social Innovator of the Year 2017 award for creating the BEEHAVE models.
"We really hope that researchers and landowners will use the model and give us feedback so we can improve it further in future" said model developer Dr Matthias Becher.
Story Source:
Materials provided by University of ExeterNote: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:
  1. Matthias A. Becher, Grace Twiston-Davies, Tim D. Penny, Dave Goulson, Ellen L. Rotheray, Juliet L. Osborne. Bumble-BEEHAVE: A systems model for exploring multifactorial causes of bumblebee decline at individual, colony, population and community levelJournal of Applied Ecology, 2018; DOI: 10.1111/1365-2664.13165




personal chefs and event catering
Miami + Miami Beach + Fort Lauderdale + Palm Beach

info@yadachef.com | 954-367-YADA (9232)

Popular posts from this blog

16 Best Benefits Of Corn (Bhutta) For Skin, Hair And Health

Corn, also known as maize or our good old ( Bhutta/Makkai/Challi ) in Hindi, ‘ Mokka Jonnalu ‘ in Telugu, ‘ Makkacholam ‘ in Tamil, ‘ Cholam ‘ in Malayalam, ‘ Musukina Jol a’ in Kannada, ‘ Makkai ‘ in Gujarati, ‘ Makai ‘ in Marathi and Punjabi and ‘ Butta ‘ in Bengali. Corn is a large grain plant which is said to have originated in Mexico and Central America. Though viewed as a vegetable, it is actually a food grain. The leafy stalk of the plant produces ears, which contain the grains known as kernels. For every kernel on the cob, there is a strand of silk. The white and yellow kernels are most popular, but today, corn is available in red, brown, blue and purple also. The white and yellow hybrids are known as butter and sugar corn which contain both kinds of kernels. This cereal is known for its pleasant taste and its versatility. Baby corn is available in cans or jars in the supermarkets and is used in Asian cooking. This grain is generally available in summer and can be

The History of Aluminum Foil: Just Don't Call it Tin Foil

Gerard Paul  September 11th, 2020  Cookware ,   Grilling & Outdoors   Aluminum foil – sometimes incorrectly called  tin foil  – is a thin, prepared sheet metal made of aluminum, often used in cooking (and food storage!). Although it may seem a little  dull  at first glance (especially on its dull side), aluminum foil has quite a fascinating story behind it. Many incredible things occurred before it became a staple in the modern kitchen. In this post, I'll discuss the various events that led to the aluminum foil revolution, and highlight the continued importance of this seemingly mundane material in our lives.  Aluminum Foil What Is Aluminum Foil? Aluminum foil is a thin sheet of  metal foil  or  metal leaf  composed of an  aluminum alloy  containing roughly 92–99 percent aluminum. It usually has a thickness between 0.0002 to 0.006 inches, but its width and strength vary greatly based on the intended application.  Just some of those applications include: Manufacturing thermal in

Strawberry Cream Pie {Easy & No-Bake} Recipe

  This Strawberry Cream Pie. Full of fresh strawberries and cream cheese, it gets an additional boost of flavor from instant pudding mix! Serve this at your next get-together, and watch it disappear! Strawberry Cream Pie 1 (9-inch) graham cracker pie crust (pre made is okay) 1 container (16 oz.) fresh (or frozen) strawberries, washed and hulled 4 tbsp. sugar 4 oz. (half of an 8 oz. pkg.) cream cheese, softened 1 pkg. (3.4 oz.) vanilla flavor instant pudding mix 1 pkg. (3.4 oz.) strawberry creme instant pudding mix 2 cups whipped cream or whipped topping, divided Additional sliced strawberries for garnish Place the 16 oz. of fresh strawberries in a food processor with the sugar. Cover and pulse a few times until the berries are finely chopped. Add the cream cheese and pulse until blended. You may need to scrape down the sides. Place the mixture in a large bowl. Add both of the dry instant pudding mixes to the bowl and stir until thoroughly combined. Gently fold in 1½ cups of the C