Skip to main content

Fresh Yeast vs Instant Yeast

Ft Lauderdale Personal Chef - Yeast

We would like to dispel the myth that fresh yeast produces better bread than dry yeast. In fact-if used properly-dry yeast will produce the exact same bread as fresh yeast. As long as the amounts are correct, the process is the same. It may even be the better choice in some situations, especially when you do not have a reliable source for fresh yeast. And, even if you do, instant yeast is a good back-up to have on hand in case you run out of fresh yeast. An unopened package of instant yeast has a shelf life of up to two years.
Active dry can be used at 50% of the weight of fresh yeast and instant dry can be used at 40% of the weight of fresh. Based on the recommendation of the yeast manufacturers, most people are under the impression that 33% is the proper conversion for instant yeast. This is true for an industrial process, but 40% is better in the artisan process, when dough temperatures are generally lower.
The instant form is the easiest to use since it does not need to be re-hydrated before adding to the dough. The only precaution is that it should not come in direct contact with cold temperatures and therefore should be mixed into the flour before adding water or added after the flour and water is incorporated.
Fresh yeast to dry yeast conversion and vice versa
The packaging types, sizes and measuring systems aren’t the only thing needing conversions. If you only have dry yeast and the recipe calls for fresh yeast, what do you do? Fresh yeast to dry yeast conversion and other way round is an easier one. Very often I read in different recipes suggestion to half or double the amount to change the type of yeast. That would result in too much of dry yeast of too little of fresh and longer proving time.
The rule of thumb is dividing or multiplying by 3:
from fresh yeast to dry – divide amount by 3, eg. instead of 30 grams of fresh yeast use 10 grams of dry
from dry yeast to fresh – multiply by 3, meaning 7 grams or dry yeast becomes 21 grams of fresh.
Another easy way to remember yeast conversion is:
10g of fresh yeast = 1 teaspoon of dry yeast
10 : 3 = 3.33 g
As you can see above, this is close to 3.5 g – the average weight of one level teaspoon of dry yeast. Teaspoon volume varies depending on the manufacturer and the shape. However, a few grams more or less of yeast won’t make a huge difference in your recipe.
Note:
The amount of dry yeast in recipes and on the packaging instruction is often exaggerated. As a result the dough rises too quickly and has a yeasty taste. Reduce the amount of yeast and allow the dough a bit of extra time if necessary.
Happy baking!
Palm Beach Personal Chef
Fort Lauderdale Personal Chef
Miami Personal Chef
Freelance Chef

Popular posts from this blog

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

NORMAN SCHMIDT DIABETES Insulin is a major issue for many individuals. While insulin is a natural part of a healthy system, when the body isn’t working perfectly then insulin can become a problem that results in pre-diabetes, diabetes, and weight loss, among many other issues. The rate of diabetes could easily become an epidemic that overwhelms the medical industry, especially as some numbers predict the rate of cases doubling from 190 million to 380 million over the next two and a half decades [1]. The good news is that in most cases insulin production in the body, and the body’s ability to properly handle it, is most often a dietary issue. This means that a proper eating plan that is carefully followed can be enough for most people to overcome their insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is a warning flag for diabetes and can make weight loss extremely difficult even for individuals who shouldn’t have a problem dropping pounds. This is where  the Insulin Resistance Die

16 Best Benefits Of Corn (Bhutta) For Skin, Hair And Health

Corn, also known as maize or our good old ( Bhutta/Makkai/Challi ) in Hindi, ‘ Mokka Jonnalu ‘ in Telugu, ‘ Makkacholam ‘ in Tamil, ‘ Cholam ‘ in Malayalam, ‘ Musukina Jol a’ in Kannada, ‘ Makkai ‘ in Gujarati, ‘ Makai ‘ in Marathi and Punjabi and ‘ Butta ‘ in Bengali. Corn is a large grain plant which is said to have originated in Mexico and Central America. Though viewed as a vegetable, it is actually a food grain. The leafy stalk of the plant produces ears, which contain the grains known as kernels. For every kernel on the cob, there is a strand of silk. The white and yellow kernels are most popular, but today, corn is available in red, brown, blue and purple also. The white and yellow hybrids are known as butter and sugar corn which contain both kinds of kernels. This cereal is known for its pleasant taste and its versatility. Baby corn is available in cans or jars in the supermarkets and is used in Asian cooking. This grain is generally available in summer and can be

Strawberry Cream Pie {Easy & No-Bake} Recipe

  This Strawberry Cream Pie. Full of fresh strawberries and cream cheese, it gets an additional boost of flavor from instant pudding mix! Serve this at your next get-together, and watch it disappear! Strawberry Cream Pie 1 (9-inch) graham cracker pie crust (pre made is okay) 1 container (16 oz.) fresh (or frozen) strawberries, washed and hulled 4 tbsp. sugar 4 oz. (half of an 8 oz. pkg.) cream cheese, softened 1 pkg. (3.4 oz.) vanilla flavor instant pudding mix 1 pkg. (3.4 oz.) strawberry creme instant pudding mix 2 cups whipped cream or whipped topping, divided Additional sliced strawberries for garnish Place the 16 oz. of fresh strawberries in a food processor with the sugar. Cover and pulse a few times until the berries are finely chopped. Add the cream cheese and pulse until blended. You may need to scrape down the sides. Place the mixture in a large bowl. Add both of the dry instant pudding mixes to the bowl and stir until thoroughly combined. Gently fold in 1½ cups of the C