Skip to main content

Foods Combining Fats And Carbohydrates More Rewarding Than Foods With Just Fats Or Carbs


personal chef fort lauderdale


Researchers show that the reward center of the brain values foods high in both fat and carbohydrates -- i.e., many processed foods -- more than foods containing only fat or only carbs. A study of 206 adults, to appear June 14 in the journal Cell Metabolism, supports the idea that these kinds of foods hijack our body's inborn signals governing food consumption.
"The biological process that regulates the association of foods with their nutritional value evolved to carefully define the value of a food so that organisms can make adaptive decisions," says senior author Dana Small, director of Yale University's Modern Diet and Physiology Research Center. "For example, a mouse should not risk running into the open and exposing itself to a predator if a food provides little energy."
"Surprisingly, foods containing fats and carbohydrates appear to signal their potential caloric loads to the brain via distinct mechanisms. Our participants were very accurate at estimating calories from fat and very poor at estimating calories from carbohydrate. Our study shows that when both nutrients are combined, the brain seems to overestimate the energetic value of the food," she says.
In work that could help explain brain-body mechanisms underlying the genetic predisposition for obesity, eating in the absence of hunger, and difficulty losing or keeping off excess weight, Small and colleagues in Germany, Switzerland, and Canada looked at the neural response to food cues.
Test subjects underwent brain scans while being shown photographs of familiar snacks containing mostly fat, mostly sugar, and a combination of fat and carbs.
Allocated a limited amount of money to bid on their first-choice foods, subjects were willing to pay more for foods that combined fat and carbohydrates. What's more, the fat-carb combo lit up neural circuits in the reward center of the brain more than a favorite food, a potentially sweeter or more energy-dense food, or a larger portion size.
Our hunter-gatherer ancestors ate mostly woody plants and animal meat, the researchers noted. "In nature, foods high in fat and carbohydrate are very rare and tend to have fiber, which slows metabolism," Small says. "By contrast, it is very common for processed foods to have high fat and high carbohydrate loads."
After the domestication of plants and animals and the development of grain and dairy production around 12,000 years ago, opportunities to consume fat and carbohydrates together increased, but processed foods like donuts, which could contain 11 grams of fat and 17 grams of carbohydrate, have only been around for 150 years, not long enough for us to evolve a new brain response to them.
Scientists believe our past experience with the nutritive properties of carbohydrates releases dopamine in the brain through an as-yet-unknown metabolic signal. These kinds of signals seem to help regulate what and how much we eat.
The researchers theorize that the simultaneous activation of fat and carbohydrate signaling pathways launches an effect that human physiology has not evolved to handle. Consistent with this suggestion, rodents given access to fat alone or carbohydrate alone regulate their total daily caloric intake and body weight. But given unrestricted access to fat and carbohydrates, they quickly gain weight.
Story Source:
Materials provided by Cell PressNote: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:
  1. Alexandra G. DiFeliceantonio, GĂ©raldine Coppin, Lionel Rigoux, Sharmili Edwin Thanarajah, Alain Dagher, Marc Tittgemeyer, Dana M. Small. Supra-Additive Effects of Combining Fat and Carbohydrate on Food RewardCell Metabolism, 2018; DOI: 10.1016/j.cmet.2018.05.018



personal chefs and event catering
Miami + Miami Beach + Fort Lauderdale + Palm Beach
info@yadachef.com | 954-367-YADA (9232)

Popular posts from this blog

16 Best Benefits Of Corn (Bhutta) For Skin, Hair And Health

Corn, also known as maize or our good old ( Bhutta/Makkai/Challi ) in Hindi, ‘ Mokka Jonnalu ‘ in Telugu, ‘ Makkacholam ‘ in Tamil, ‘ Cholam ‘ in Malayalam, ‘ Musukina Jol a’ in Kannada, ‘ Makkai ‘ in Gujarati, ‘ Makai ‘ in Marathi and Punjabi and ‘ Butta ‘ in Bengali. Corn is a large grain plant which is said to have originated in Mexico and Central America. Though viewed as a vegetable, it is actually a food grain. The leafy stalk of the plant produces ears, which contain the grains known as kernels. For every kernel on the cob, there is a strand of silk. The white and yellow kernels are most popular, but today, corn is available in red, brown, blue and purple also. The white and yellow hybrids are known as butter and sugar corn which contain both kinds of kernels. This cereal is known for its pleasant taste and its versatility. Baby corn is available in cans or jars in the supermarkets and is used in Asian cooking. This grain is generally available in summer and can be

The History of Aluminum Foil: Just Don't Call it Tin Foil

Gerard Paul  September 11th, 2020  Cookware ,   Grilling & Outdoors   Aluminum foil – sometimes incorrectly called  tin foil  – is a thin, prepared sheet metal made of aluminum, often used in cooking (and food storage!). Although it may seem a little  dull  at first glance (especially on its dull side), aluminum foil has quite a fascinating story behind it. Many incredible things occurred before it became a staple in the modern kitchen. In this post, I'll discuss the various events that led to the aluminum foil revolution, and highlight the continued importance of this seemingly mundane material in our lives.  Aluminum Foil What Is Aluminum Foil? Aluminum foil is a thin sheet of  metal foil  or  metal leaf  composed of an  aluminum alloy  containing roughly 92–99 percent aluminum. It usually has a thickness between 0.0002 to 0.006 inches, but its width and strength vary greatly based on the intended application.  Just some of those applications include: Manufacturing thermal in

Strawberry Cream Pie {Easy & No-Bake} Recipe

  This Strawberry Cream Pie. Full of fresh strawberries and cream cheese, it gets an additional boost of flavor from instant pudding mix! Serve this at your next get-together, and watch it disappear! Strawberry Cream Pie 1 (9-inch) graham cracker pie crust (pre made is okay) 1 container (16 oz.) fresh (or frozen) strawberries, washed and hulled 4 tbsp. sugar 4 oz. (half of an 8 oz. pkg.) cream cheese, softened 1 pkg. (3.4 oz.) vanilla flavor instant pudding mix 1 pkg. (3.4 oz.) strawberry creme instant pudding mix 2 cups whipped cream or whipped topping, divided Additional sliced strawberries for garnish Place the 16 oz. of fresh strawberries in a food processor with the sugar. Cover and pulse a few times until the berries are finely chopped. Add the cream cheese and pulse until blended. You may need to scrape down the sides. Place the mixture in a large bowl. Add both of the dry instant pudding mixes to the bowl and stir until thoroughly combined. Gently fold in 1½ cups of the C