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Showing posts with the label vegetables

Polish Pickled Beets

Pickled Beets Serves up to 8 3 cups/1.124 pounds/510g/6 medium beets, roasted and peeled* 1 tablespoon/15ml fresh grated horseradish 8 whole cloves  2 cups/500ml white vinegar 1 tablespoon/15 sugar 2 teaspoons/10ml YaDa Chef Maya Natural Sea Salt In a large glass bowl or baking dish layer the beets with horseradish and cloves.  Boil vinegar with sugar and salt stirring to dissolve.  Pour over the beets, cover for 24 hours.  * make it simple and use canned beets Palm Beach Personal Chef Fort Lauderdale Personal Chef Miami Personal Chef Freelance Chef www.yadachef.com

Quinoa Salad (keen was) Recipe

The first time I encountered quinoa I was living with my cousin in Manhattan on the lower east side. She was not the most handy person in the kitchen. When I walked in she yelled from her bedroom that the air-popper may be broken as she tried to “pop” the little seeds like you would pop corn and they got sucked into the air vents. This turned out well and since my day consisted of nothing but "creating at a desk"....I had time to sit down and eat. I added fresh tomato and left out the broccoli. Serves 4 2 ½ cups/625ml water or vegetable broth 2 cups/450ml quinoa 2 cups/450ml broccoli  ¼ cup/59ml red bell pepper ¼ cup/59ml yellow bell pepper ¼ cup/60ml canola oil 2 tablespoons/30ml fresh lime juice ½ teaspoon/2ml salt ¼ teaspoon/1ml black pepper Bring water or broth to a boil (if using water add salt). Add quinoa, lower heat, cover and simmer until all of the liquid is absorbed (15-20 minutes). Add broccoli to quinoa the last 5 minutes and allow to steam on top to

What Are Beet Greens Good For? Beet Greens Recipe

Botanical name: Beta vulgaris Grown in the Mediterranean region as far back as 2,000 B.C., beet cultivation spread to Babylonia in the eighth century, then to China around 850 A.D. Beets, along with their greens, belong to the Goosefoot family, known as Chenopodiaceae. Within the botanical family, beet greens are factored alongside spinach, Swiss chard, quinoa, lamb's quarter, and a number of other wild plants, which means that beet greens can be placed in the “dark, leafy” category. Because they are a cool season crop, beets grow quickly and can survive almost freezing temperatures, making them a favorite of northern gardeners. Beets and their greens also enjoy a longer than normal growing season. It’s best to use beet greens within two or three days after refrigeration. Enjoy beet greens by themselves as a salad or with other leafy vegetables, or sauté them in a bit of olive oil or balsamic vinegar and salt for a delicious side dish. Here’s a great tip: if you find you